It Works

The holistic therapists who go beyond the skin deep

Aone-size-fits-all approach no longer cuts it when it comes to face and body treatments. That precious hour spent in a spa needs to count – we want to learn something new and soak up expert advice, not just lie there with a face mask on. When you place yourself in the hands of an expert, it shows – and not just on your skin. In order to work from the inside out, the best treatments come close to therapy. A rare slot with London-based expert Marie Reynolds was revelatory, and not just in terms of easing aching muscles. A trained counsellor, Reynolds can read myriad truths by simply looking at your feet, face and back – her ability to pinpoint what you’re lacking is unnervingly accurate, and it can be an emotional experience. To see Reynolds herself, you’ll need to head to the Bulgari Spa in Mayfair, but she has personally trained therapists at Dublin’s Dawson Spa. Similarly, those in search of their deep-down best skin know to make a beeline for Nuala Woulfe’s Glasthule salon. When I visited, I had a terrible cold and was doubtful that even someone with Woulfe’s formidable reputation could make a difference to my blotchy, dry, reddened skin. But this is where more than 20 years’ experience come in. Brisk and astute, Woulfe is an expert interviewer, extracting a wealth of information to ascertain what your skin needs. She can tell instantly if you’re lacking a certain mineral or skimping on your water intake. The salon recently became Ireland’s SkinCeuticals flagship, and Woulfe has created a new Skin Renew Facial (€125), designed to reduce the signs of sun damage and photo-ageing. If your skin is looking dull, this facial is for you: “It improves texture and tone with the infusion of pure vitamin C and topical antioxidants,” notes Woulfe. SkinCeuticals was founded by a dermatologist in 1994, and the more you learn about the range, the more you want to sweep everything else off your shelf and commit; when it’s recommended by skin experts like Dr Rosemarie Coleman and Una Brennan, it’s even more compelling. Woulfe’s facial incorporates LED light therapy, used to counter everything from SAD to hair loss; it stimulates collagen production for a noticeable improvement in the skin’s health, and feels strangely uplifting. An anti-inflammatory gel peel with salicylic acid eases pore congestion and wrinkles, and a customised vitamin C-rich mask detoxifies the skin. Afterwards, I felt markedly rejuvenated and energised, and my skin was plumper and brighter. Skin remains springier a few weeks on, boosted by the wondrous Resveratrol BE night treatment (€140), which turbo-charges your beauty sleep. Nuala Woulfe, 4C & 55B Glasthule Road, Sandycove, Co Dublin, 01 230 0244; www.nualawoulfe.ie. www.skinceuticals.co.uk. www.mariereynoldslondon.com.

This story appears in the April issue of The Gloss. Find more features like this in next issue, out Thursday May 7

The Beauty Edit

The Primer

Skin primers can help smooth the way to wearing less foundation, but sometimes the extra silicone makes everything pill or flake. smashbox Photo Finish Primer Water solves the problem, refreshing skin and setting make-up in the lightest way. €24. If you think of the brand as only for teens, think again: word is that only New York and Dubai sell more Smashbox than Arnotts, with classics like their Always Sharp Lipliners (€19) winning over beauty lovers of every age.

This story appears in the April issue of The Gloss. Find more features like this in next issue, out Thursday May 7

Brace Yourself

Everyone’s straightening up their act, as more adults adopt braces in the quest for perfect teeth. Sarah Halliwell reports

As the world becomes increasingly Instagram-centric, our self-consciousness is extending beyond hair and make-up to our teeth. While once it was just teenagers flashing metal when they spoke, now adults blithely sport wires or invisible braces. We all have our vanity dealbreaker: if Botox or filler feels a step too far, a bit of dentistry might seem a palatable way to make us feel more confident and youthful. And offers of “six-month braces” make a perfect smile sound easily accessible.

Back in the 1970s, braces were uncomfortable and embarrassing to wear, with only kids submitting to them. Now, though, they seem as much part of middle age as hair dye. WhatClinic.com notes that searches for braces have increased 57 per cent in the past twelve months; MyDental Clinics have seen a marked rise in the uptake of short-term braces, with a 30 per cent increase since last autumn. And every orthodontist we spoke to said half their client list is made up of adults, those people who might have prioritised their children’s teeth, but regarded it as purely cosmetic and a bit vain to try orthodontics  for themselves.

“Everyone wants to look the best they can,” says Dr Anne O’Donoghue of the Northumberland Institute of Dental Medicine. She has seen a rise, particularly among those in their forties and upwards, “and you’d be surprised how many men are looking to improve their smile,” she adds. We’re partly influenced by the super-straight, blinding smiles we’re endlessly exposed to on Netflix; but in fact, says O’Donoghue, most patients just want to look like themselves, but better.

“People are very aware of the importance of having an attractive smile – it gives them self-confidence,” says orthodontist Dr Niall LeMasney, who emphasises that straight teeth are not simply an aesthetic consideration: crooked and crowded teeth are harder to clean and can contribute to tooth decay and gum disease.

This story appears in the April issue of The Gloss. Find more features like this in next issue, out Thursday May 7

The Beauty Edit

The Skin

A raft of new bases with benefits shows the “skincare meets make-up” trend. For on the go: bareminerals Complexion Rescue (€29) is skincare first, tint second, combining the best of skincare with cover and SPF30. For evening: Dior Nude Air Serum Foundation (€51.50) combines plant oils and vitamins to  to revive and nourish skin, allowing skin to breathe. For daytime: L’Occitane Precious BB Cream (€35), with organic immortelle essential oil to nourish skin.

This story appears in the April issue of The Gloss. Find more features like this in next issue, out Thursday May 7